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“Good Food, Good Wine, Beautiful Scenery” is the motto of Ferguson Valley, a picturesque destination two hours south of Perth.

“Good food, good wine and beautiful scenery” is the motto of Ferguson Valley, a picturesque destination two hours south of Perth, that captures the hearts and imagination of children, as much as it does adults.

A journey through the Ferguson Valley is one to remember, featuring an impressive backdrop of rolling hills with grazing cattle, meandering streams, misty mornings and astounding autumn colours. Driving along steep, winding roads, the views are bound to take your breath away; and you’ll have the same reaction to their vast array of wines.

The Ferguson Valley climate is ideal for medium to full bodied wines including Shiraz, Tempranillo, Cabernet Sauvignon, Semillon and Chardonnay.  You will also discover some light aromatic fortified wines that are perfect on the cooler evenings.

Just a short 15-minute drive from the regional centre of Bunbury you will find the historic town of Dardanup, which marks the beginning of the Ferguson Valley. Travelling through the valley you will discover an impressive range of attractions from art galleries to a village of Gnomes, featuring thousands of Gnomes from across the world. The Wellington Dam plus the magnificent native bushland have made this area a mecca for bushwalkers, cyclists and mountain bikers who enjoy one of WA’s best mountain bike trails at Mount Lennard.

The proximity of the city of Bunbury offers visitors the best of the city with the delights of the country all within easy proximity.

Topography: Hilly
Soil: Gravelly sandy loams. Loams and Granite Hills
Water: Surface Water

The Ferguson Valley climate is ideal for medium to full bodied table wines including Shiraz, Tempranillo, Cabernet Sauvignon, Semillon and Chardonnay.  The climate is also ideal for light aromatic fortified wines.

Climate
Heat Degree days: 1700
Sunshine hours per day: 8.5
Annual Rainfall: 700-900
Growing season rainfall: 185
Mean Jan temp: 22
Harvest: Early Feb to Early April

Some altitude and proximity to the coast moderate high temperatures and allow access to cooling sea breezes and higher afternoon humidities.

Known as the apple capital of the South West, Donnybrook is fast becoming recognised for its hidden depths of taste and visual splendour.

Known as the apple capital of the South West, Donnybrook is fast becoming recognised for its hidden depths of taste, texture and visual splendour.

The region is winning critical acclaim for its superb wines, especially Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon, produced by small, dedicated producers in the hills and valleys around the town and along the Preston Valley.
 
While you soak up the rich pastures, scenic waterways and native forests, your appetite will be spoilt for choice with farm fresh marron, organic beef, rich olive oil, nuts and the sweet taste of sun dried fruits.

With an abundance of apple and stone fruit orchards, Donnybrook also produces excellent cider and is home to the Apple Fun Park children’s playground – the “Biggest Free Entry Fun Park” in Australia, which is the perfect family picnic area to wind down after a busy day out sight seeing and tasting.

The main street also offers a variety of cafés that are perfect for a relaxing cappuccino or tasty meal after a visit to the town’s shops and galleries.

Set in a backdrop of natural seasonal displays with stunning spring blossoms, wildflowers, lush native forests and extraordinary autumn overtures, Donnybrook hosts a smorgasbord of activities for all visitors.

For those that prefer to get the blood pumping or to work off some of the regional delicacies, Glen Mervyn Dam, located to the east of Donnybrook, is the perfect destination for water-skiing and swimming in the warmer months.

Donnybrook has a rich history and was once the focus of a gold rush when gold was discovered in 1897, however mining ceased abruptly in 1903 after just six years.

Explore. Taste. Enjoy. Spoil yourself. Exploit your senses and feel very much invited.

Topography: 
Hilly and coastal plain.
Soil: 
Gravelly sandy loams.
Water:
Surface water.
Whilst slightly warmer (Oakway is located only 15kms from Jarrahwood which is frequently the coldest place in the state). than other areas within the Geographe Wine Region, the conditions are excellent for the production of  high quality table wines.

Heat Degree days: 1700
Sunshine hours per day: 8.5
Annual Rainfall: 700-900
Growing season rainfall: 185
Mean Jan temp: 22
Harvest: Early Feb to Early April

Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Malbec, Grenache, Zinfandel, Graciano, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc, Mourvedre, Vermentino, Bastardo, Sousao, Touriga Nacional, Tinta Cao, Barbera, Chenin Blanc.

Capel is located 212 kilometres south of Perth, midway between Bunbury and Busselton, and boasts 29km of panoramic coastline.

Capel is located 212 kilometres south of Perth, midway between Bunbury and Busselton, and boasts 29km of panoramic, breath taking coastline. Ranging from the pristine beaches skirting Geographe Bay to the Whicher Range, this beautiful part of Western Australia offers the best of both worlds.
The district features the clear waters of Geographe Bay which are perfect for fishing, scuba diving, surfing and boating, not far from rolling hills and large areas of Jarrah and Tuart forests. In fact, the majestic tuart trees surrounding Capel are part of the last remaining naturally occurring tuart forest in the world.
The town is situated on the Capel River and has a Mediterranean climate, with hot dry summers and cool wet winters. Along the coastal plains Geographe wine producers have excelled with full-bodied table wines and port styles including Merlot, Shiraz, Grenache and Semillon. While in the cooler Whicher Range, you’ll find lip-smacking light to medium bodied white wines such as Sauvignon Blanc and Viognier, and medium to full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon.
Capel is full of seasonal wonders, including the picturesque Ironstone Gully Falls, which has an enchanting picnic area. In the wet season, the stream, having followed a course through one of the state’s many fine jarrah forests, crosses under the road and gently rambles over a series of rapids – the Falls drop over a ledge of nine metres.
Pack a picnic basket and don’t forget to include the wine, cheese and fresh produce as you discover and explore. Visiting golfers can enjoy a superb grass green private golf course, complete with friendly resident kangaroos, while animal lovers can spend an afternoon horse riding at the Stirling Estate Equestrian Centre.
If you enjoy being surrounded by the beauty of nature, then make Capel your destination.
Topography: 
Flat coastal plain rising to an average elevation of 170 metres through the Whicher Range.
Soil: 
Gravelly ironstone, free draining loamy soils through the Whicher Range. Sandy soils on the coastal plain.
Water:
Spring and ground water in the Whicher Range. Groundwater on the coastal plain.
On the coastal plains, the effects of high ripening temperatures and sunshine hours are offset by the cooling afternoon breezes of coming off the Geographe Bay, creating a climate that is ideal for the production of full bodied table wines. In the Whicher Range at Chapman Hill, temperatures are slightly cooler through the ripening period with the cool winds at night coming off the Southern Ocean, giving rise to wines with flavour intensity and finesse.

Heat Degree days: 1700
Sunshine hours per day: 8.5
Annual Rainfall: 790-900
Growing season rainfall: 185
Mean Jan temp: 22
Harvest: Capel Early Feb to Early April, Chapman Hill Late February to Late April

Full bodied table wines and port styles including Merlot, Shiraz, Grenache and Semillon on the coastal plains. In the cooler Whicher Range, light to medium bodied white table wines such as Sauvignon Blanc and Viognier, and medium to full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon.

Also known as ‘the events capital of regional Western Australia’, visitors are spoilt for choice with seaside cafes, kiosks, bars and restaurants, all with the stunning beachfront view.

Located 220 kilometres south west of Perth, the stunning holiday resort town of Busselton lies sheltered along the shore of Geographe Bay.

Also known as ‘the events capital of regional Western Australia’, Busselton is best known for its 1.8 kilometre long, wooden-piled jetty which has survived cyclone, storm and fire to retain its status as the longest timber-piled jetty in the southern hemisphere.

Here, visitors can stroll along a seemingly endless white, sandy beach towards Cape Naturaliste, 30 kilometres to the west.

The newly refurbished Busselton Foreshore is a lovely place to enjoy a relaxing afternoon with free barbecues, new children’s playground and beautiful views of the bay and Busselton Jetty.

With the jetty as a focal point, the waterfront is a hive of activity. Visitors are spoilt for choice with seaside cafes, kiosks, bars and restaurants, all with the stunning beachfront view.

Take a walk or train ride to the end of the Busselton Jetty, which is one of the main Busselton attractions, to the Underwater Observatory where you can see amazing marine life.

The bustling main street has a cosmopolitan vibe, with people bustling from alfresco restaurants, cafes and pubs and boutique shops.

The allure doesn’t stop there, with an events calendar bursting with music, sporting and cultural events.

There’re so many things to do in Busselton and plenty of accommodation options ranging from beachfront five star resorts, private villas, family fun holiday parks, bed and breakfasts and everything in between.

Topography:
Flat coastal plain rising to an average elevation of 170 metres through the Whicher Range.
Soil:
Gravelly ironstone, free draining loamy soils through the Whicher Range. Sandy soils on the coastal plain.
Water:
Spring and ground water in the Whicher Range. Groundwater on the coastal plain.
On the coastal plains the effects of high ripening temperatures and sunshine hours are offset by the cooling afternoon breezes of coming off the Geographe Bay, creating a climate that is ideal for the production of full bodied table wines.

In the Whicher Range at Chapman Hill, temperatures are slightly cooler through the ripening period with the cool winds at night coming off the Southern Ocean, giving rise to wines with flavour intensity and finesse.

Heat Degree days: 1700
Sunshine hours per day: 8.5
Annual Rainfall: 790-900
Growing season rainfall: 185
Mean Jan temp: 22
Harvest: Capel > Early Feb to Early April, Chapman Hill > Late February to Late April

Full bodied table wines and port styles including Merlot, Shiraz, Grenache and Semillon on the coastal plains. In the cooler Whicher Range, light to medium bodied white table wines such as Sauvignon Blanc and Viognier, and medium to full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon.

Just 141km south of Perth and 46km from Bunbury, Harvey is nestled on fertile, irrigated plains beneath the rolling hills of the Darling Scarp, in the heart of dairy country.

Just 141km south of Perth and 46km from Bunbury, Harvey is nestled on fertile, irrigated plains beneath the rolling hills of the Darling Scarp, in the heart of dairy country. Situated on the Harvey River, Harvey boasts a unique Italian heritage that has given the vibrant community a cosmopolitan feel. Harvey has built an international reputation for prime beef production, citrus growing and of course, viticulture. The towns’ dairy farming also provides the bulk of Western Australia’s milk supply.

However, there’s a lot more to Harvey than meets the eye.

The thriving town is home to popular wineries Vineyard 28, Harvey River Estate, , Moojelup Farm, Fifth Estate, Skipworth Wines and the Old Coast Road Brewery. Stirling Cottage, located in the town of Harvey, is the first home of May Gibbs, the celebrated children’s author, where the inspiration for Snugglepot and Cuddlepie developed.

For the foodies, a stopover at Ha Ve Cheese is a must. This award winning gourmet cheese factory has free cheese tastings and factory viewing; their mouth-watering selection of cakes and ice creams are also a must-try.

There are plenty of activities to keep you busy during a day, or even a weeklong stay.  Why not get off the beaten track and enjoy a camping adventure, with days spent fishing, bushwalking, swimming and enjoying barbecue picnics. The Harvey Dam makes for a scenic picnic spot with barbecues, an amphitheatre, walking trails and playground. Trout and perch fishing are also popular here between September and May.

Touring through the Harvey region, you’ll find dairies filled with happy cows, jarrah forests alive with wildflowers and small cottages with Devonshire teas, which gives the area an old worldly appeal. We invite you to explore Harvey and indulge in some of the local produce, to delight all tastes!

Topography:
Hilly and coastal plain.
Soil:
Gravelly sandy loams and loams in the hills. Alluvial soils at the foot of the hills. Sandy soils on the coastal plain.
Water:
Irrigation scheme. Surface water in the hills. Groundwater on the coastal plain.

Ripening temp and sunshine hours are in the upper range for good quality table wines but close proximity to the coast moderate high temperatures to a certain extent. Sea breezes and high afternoon humidities are also beneficial.

Heat Degree days: 1700
Sunshine hours per day: 8.5
Annual Rainfall: 700-900
Growing season rainfall: 185
Mean Jan temp: 22
Harvest: Early Feb to Early April

Full bodied table wines  with the familiar varieties such as Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon. Harvey is also home to alternative varieties such as Arneis, Nebbiolo, Tempranillo, Vermentino and Dolcetto.